Treatment of Cervical cancer

Treatment of Cervical cancer

Treatment of Cervical cancer

Read Cervical Cancer First.

Treatment of cervical cancers depends on the staging and the depth of invasion. For example for invasion of less than 3 mm (stage IA-1) treatment includes a hysterectomy or the option of cervical conization in women who wish to preserve fertility. The staging of cervical cancer involves the following:

The International Federation of Obstetrics and Gynecology (FIGO). It permits assessment through biopsy, physical examination, cystoscopy, proctoscopy, excretory urography (intravenous pyelography or IVP), and plain film x-ray of the chest and skeletal system. The American Joint Cancer Committee staging is also involved.

Staging in cervical cancer

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How diet helps to prevent or Treat Cervical Cancer

How diet helps to prevent or Treat Cervical Cancer

How diet helps to prevent or Treat Cervical Cancer

Diet has become an important component in fighting different types of cancer. In fact, it is recommended, for example, that you eat at least five servings of fruits and vegetables daily and eat the right amount of food to stay healthy. Here are some of the foods and or ingredients that are important in fighting and helping in treating cervical cancer.

Vegetables

Cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli, cabbage, cauliflowers and kales are known to contain substances such as diindolylmethane (DIM) which has been show to inhibit the development of cervical cancer. The DIM acts by inhibiting the growth of the cancer cells of induce a programmed cell death (apoptosis) of the tumor cells. Other compounds that help in killing the cancer cells include the Indole-3-Carbinol (I3C) which also acts by preventing the papilloma virus-initiated cervical cancer. This is an important factor in managing cervical cancer.

Mushrooms

Karawatake Mushrooms and other compounds that contain PSP have been proven to improve the quality of life in patients suffering from cancers especially cervical cancer.
PSP is a type of Proteoglycan / Peptidomannan found in Japanese medicinal mushrooms.

Fruits

Carotenoids are an important component in inhibiting the development of cervical cancer cells. Fruits that are rich in carotenoids such as carrots, mango, cantaloupe melon, apricot, papaya, banana, apples and straw berry come in handy. Foods rich in beta carotenoids include the above mentioned in addition to water melon, grapes, spinach, Spirulina, garlic and corn.

Selenium

Selenium is an essential micronutrient with extended benefits in improving e immune system, preventing blood clotting, preventing arthrosclerosis and helping to lower blood pressure. Selenium deficiency has been found in patients with cervical cancer. Studies in lab animals have proven the same and an increase in the selenium in water given to the animal reduced the incidence by a significant amount. Foods that are rich in selenium include

  • Cereal Grains such as wheat Germ, whole grain bread, wheat Bran, barley, brown rice, oat Bran, rye, rice bran and white rice
  • Dairy foods such as cow milk and butter
  • Poultry foods  such as  chicken liver, turkey and egg yolk
  • Fungi such as dried shiitake mushrooms
  • Legumes such as kidney Beans
  • Meats including beef, liver, lamb, kidneys rabbit meat and ham
  • Nuts including brazil nuts, peanuts, almond, cashew, walnuts, hazelnuts and macadamia nuts
  • Sea foods like herring, tuna , crab , oysters, lobster, cod and prawns
  • Seeds like sunflower Seeds and mustard Seeds

Vitamins

There is a correlation between vitamin deficiency and development of cervical cancer in some patients. Vitamins such as Folic acid, vitamins B1, 2, 6 and B12, Vitamins C, D and E are important in preventing and treating cancer. Folic acid is important I development of cell DNA and deficiency of folate increases the risk of cancer development. This happens during the weak chromosomal stage when the HPV virus is incorporated into the cells.

Quinones

Coenzyme Q10 has a similar molecular structure to the vitamin E and K. It is a fat soluble compound that has been shown to help to prevent cervical cancer. The compound helps to prevent cancer cell growth and leads to rapid death of the cancer cells (apoptosis).

The sources of this compound include:

  • Dietary Oils including rape seed, soybean,  sesame, and cottonseed oil
  • Chicken eggs
  • Grains such as rice bran, wheat germ
  • Legumes including soybeans
  • Meats
  • Nuts such as hazelnuts, walnuts, chestnuts, almonds. Pistachio, and peanuts
  • Vegetables such as cabbage, broccoli, spinach, cauliflower, potato, garlic, onion, eggplant and carrot
  • Commercially available supplements

Cervical cancer is a public health problem. Early diagnosis and treatment is important in reducing the incidences and complications. More over diets management is also important in prevention and treatment. Patients who are over weight are also at a higher risk of developing the cancer. This underscores the importance of having a proper diet in management of cancer among women.
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Cervical cancer

Cervical cancer

Cervical cancer

Introduction

Cervical cancer is uncontrolled growth of abnormal cells and tissue within the cervix (the neck of the uterus). The uterus is the womb where babies are grown. There is then an abnormal growth of cells presenting with hypertrophy (increase of cell size), hyperplasia (the increase of the numbers of cervical cells), anaplasia (formation of atypical shapes of cervical cell shape), and poor cervical cell function.The increasing cell size and numbers lead to an increase in the size of the surrounding tissues with the invasion of more abnormal cells from the cervix.

The cells are so aggressive and invade the surrounding tissues by competing for blood supply to the tissues. These cells are easily detected by a Pap smear test as they are shed from the.

Cervical cancer causes

There are several know causes of cervical cancer. The main cause of cervical cancer is an infection with Human papilloma virus (HPV) serotypes 16, 18, 31, 33, 45, and 56 which account for more than 80% of all invasive cervical cancers.

However most of the causes are associated with specific risk factors that women face. A regular Pap smear tests is important as a screening tool and a preventive measure for cervical cancer among women.

What are the risk factors for cervical cancer?

  • Associated risk factors include
  • Having multiple sexual partners
  • Women living in lower socioeconomic status
  • Cigarette smoking
  • A history of sexually transmitted diseases such as chlamydia, HPV infection
  • Immunosuppression
  • Oral contraceptive use.
  • Certain types of sexual behavior such as
    1. Women who have sex at an early age
    2. Women who have multiple sexual partners
    3. Women who have partners who have many other sex partners
    4. Women who have sex with uncircumcised men
  • Smoking or nicotine
  • Infections with Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)
  • Diet with increased levels of homocysteine has been associated with increased risk of having cervical cancer. Vitamin deficiency has also been implicated in development of cervical cancer. Lack of
  • Prolonged use of oral contraceptives (birth control pills)
  • Women who have multiple pregnancies
  • Women living in low socioeconomic status
  • Injection with diethylstilbestrol (DES) drugs
  • Women who have relatives who had cervical cancer
  • Exposure to radiation of any type especially these on treatment for other cancers
  • Exposure to compounds that may affect nuclear genetic material such as benzene
  • Prolonged stressful conditions

Screening for cervical cancer

From the evidence obtained from large control studies, it is recommended that:

Screening for cervical cancer with a Pap smear test can achieve an 80% reduction in death rates from the cancer in the target population of women aged between 25 to 60 years.

It is also recommended that women have a screening interval of one year with conventional Pap smear tests or every 2 years using liquid-based cytology.

After the age of 30, women who have had three consecutive, technically satisfactory screening results may be screened every 2-3 years.

The American Cancer society recommend that cervical cancer screening should begin 3 years after the onset of vaginal intercourse and no later than age 21 years of age

Women who are age 70 years or older with an intact cervix and who have had 3 or more documented satisfactory cervical screening test results within the 10-yr period before age 70 may cease to have the routine cervical cancer screening tests

Those who have had uterus removal (with removal of the cervix need not undergo screening tests.

Cervical cancer epidemiology

Although cervical cancer is the third most common gynecologic cancer in the United States, it is the most common malignancy worldwide.

Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer in women in the world, with an estimated 500,000 cases in 2003.

Screening for cervical cancer with follow up and treatment has helped reduce the incidences of cancer. How ever this may not be true in some countries or regions such as the Latin America, the Caribbean, and Africa, where cervical cancer is the most common cause of cancer-related death in women

The incidences are high among the whites in the United States with an estimated 8.1 new cases per 100,000 each year as compared with 11 per 100,000 in African-American women and 14.4 per 100,000 in Hispanic populations.
Symptoms of cervical cancer

  • There are no symptoms in those in precancerous stage
  • There is an unusual vaginal bleeding, particularly after sex
  • A vaginal discharge with odor
  • Early invasive cancers may also present with no symptoms although some women will notice postcoital (after sex), between menses, or postmenopausal spotting.
  • Some women will present with malodorous vaginal discharge
  • Painful coitus (dyspareunia)
  • Cramping pelvic pain from uterine contractions
  • Chronic blood loss may result in symptoms of anemia in some patients
  • There may be pelvic pain
  • In advanced stages, there may b lower limb swelling (from occlusion of pelvic lymph vessels or thrombosis of the external iliac vein)
  • Advanced stages of disease may lead to anorexia, dysgeusia and unintentional weight loss

Diagnosing cervical cancer

  • The following tests may be performed to help in diagnosis of cervical cancer.
  • The healthcare provider will perform a detailed history and physical examination
  • Pelvic examination which includes examination of the vagina, cervical and related organs
  • Pap smear test.
  • Test for human papilloma virus (HPV) DNA. There is a high sensitivity for the detection of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia with these tests. This test helps to reduce the incidence of grade 2 or 3 cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) or cancer detected by subsequent screening examinations.
  • Colposcopy The method of examining the vagina and by means of a binocular instrument known as the colposcope, to screen for cancer of the cervix. The clinician may also use this test to do biopsy and endocervical curettage.
  • Complete blood count
  • A squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) antigen test
  • Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA)
  • Chest x-ray examination

Continue reading about Treatment of Cervical cancer.

Must Have Medical Tests for Women

Must Have Medical Tests for Women

Must Have Medical Tests for Women

Have you any idea that as women, we all need to have certain medical tests and health screenings throughout our lives? For example, did you know that vision and hearing screenings are recommended during every decade of your life? Learn why we need these and other health screenings.

Pap Test – The Pap test or a Pap smear is important for all women age 21 and above. Sexually active young women under 21 also need Pap assessments starting within three years of the first time sexual intercourse happened. The Pap test, originally developed by Dr. George Papanicolaou in the 1950s, detects abnormal changes in cervical cells that may led to cervical cancer if not detected by annual Pap smears.

Prior to the introduction of the Pap test, cervical malignancy was the leading cause of cancer death in women. Thanks to Dr. Papanicolaou’s research and his hard work developing the Pap smear, cervical malignancy is now 15th, among causes of cancer deaths in women with about 3,700 women dying of cervical malignancy each year.
More: What Happens During Your Pelvic Exam and Pap Test

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